Women Can See Through Flashy Cars And Bling

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High-resolution 96-kHz/24-bit or 192-kHz/24-bit digital recordings only produce incremental improvements in the believability of sound over CDs; the other factors mentioned above play much larger roles in sound quality than higher-resolution audio. Neil Young's crusade to introduce a new high-resolution format is well intentioned, but misses the fundamental problem of how the original recordings sounded in the first place. Play a heavily compressed and equalized recording in Young's Pono player and it's still going to sound like crap. The old "garbage in, garbage out" truism definitely applies. I'd rather listen to a great-sounding recording as an MP3 than an awful-sounding one in a high-resolution player. Technical perfection is one thing; making lifelike recordings can't be reduced to a numbers game. Great sound is more of an artistic than technical pursuit. Sadly, Young's device won't do a thing to fix the recording's inherent flaws. It has to sound good to start with.

Both fictitious men had the same budget, but while one spent the money on a reliable brand new vehicle, the other blew it on a cheaper used car and used the rest of the money to repaint it, get larger wheels and a more powerful stereo truth.

They were able to confirm that these samples came from no fewer than two parent bodies and that the crystallization of their minerals occurred about 4.6 billion years ago, only two million years after condensation of the oldest solids in the Solar Syste

Now a team composed of members from the Carnegie Institution, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and the University of Maryland are studying diogenites - a type of metoerite thought to have originated on the asteroid Vesp

I recently asked Stereophile magazine's editor, John Atkinson, to name the record that made him take notice of the sound, and without hesitating for a second he said, "Jimi Hendrix, 'Electric Ladyland.'" Good choice!

This might be a tough question for a lot of people: defining what good sound is, and separating sound from music isn't easy. It might be impossible to distill it to just one album or song. We tend to like the sound of music we like, and conflate good sound with good music. That's understandable, but when the sound jumps out and draws your attention, take, for example, the sound of Jimi Hendrix's feedback. It was Hendrix's distortion, not his songs, that forever changed the sound of electric guitars.

'It will also be under warranty, so any mechanical problems will be covered for a few years.' The flashy man, Dave, has the same amount of money to spend but wants a car that he can feel proud to drive.

Examination of the samples determined that the highly siderophile elements present in the diogenite meteorites were present during formation of the rocks, which could only occur if late addition or 'accretion' of these elements after core formation had taken plac

In the case of Earth, there followed crust formation, the development of an atmosphere, and plate tectonics, among other geologic processes, so the evidence for this early period is no longer preserve

That's when I realized that striving for ever more accurate recordings wouldn't improve sound quality. The things that make sound pleasing to the ear aren't limited to making technically better recordings (or hi-fis). Great-sounding recordings sound great mostly because of the hundreds or thousands of decisions made by the engineers who recorded, mixed, and mastered the music. Their choice of using a microphone that flattered the vocalist or saxophone, the acoustics of the recording venue, the processing that was used to create each sound within the mix make or break the sound. The recording format also plays a role, but analog or digital, they're just a small part of the overall sound picture. Perfect sound isn't really what most engineers are striving for; they just want to make a recording that sounds good. And good sound is a purely subjective call.

Dr Daniel Kruger, lead author of the study, said: stereo truth 'The thinking has been that men spend so much on luxury items as a signal of wealth, because women look for how much they can invest in a relationship and any children they might have together.

For me, it was the first Led Zeppelin album. The music hit me hard, of course, but it really was the power of the recording; everything else sounded like black-and-white, and Zeppelin's music was in Technicolor. Bonham's drums in particular were so much bigger, more immediate and driving than other records in the late 1960s. Motown and the Beatles records were way up there for me, but Zeppelin's sound was beyond the rest. I wanted to hear that sound more clearly, and that's how I became an audiophile.

The team is studying nine samples - seven from Antarctica and two from the African desert - in attempt to learn more about how the Earth has changed from its formation in the early days of the Solar System to the present-day layering of metal core and mantle, and crus